How to optimize your app’s UX using Heatmaps?
Heatmaps

How to optimize your app’s UX using Heatmaps?

Vimlesh Gautam
3
 min read

Whatever we do, we always have a lot of questions running in our mind all the time. Sometimes these questions help us make better decisions. 


For UX designers, the questions before they start to design an app are


What should be the style of the app?

What font should I use? What color code suits the style?

For product teams, It is quite different.


Who are all the target audience?


What should be the marketing strategy or the budget for designing the app and the list goes on.


However the truth is though these are all questions that have to be taken care of, there are certain questions that need to be answered.


How do you want your users to engage with your app? 


What is the experience you are designing for your users inside the app?


If you think your app doesn’t have a solid answer to the above questions, Do not worry.


By the end of this article, you will be able to optimize the UX of your app that can provide your users with better experience.


To be able to optimize the UX of your app, you need to spot the problems that are making the user behave differently.


But how do we do that? Heatmaps.


What are heatmaps?

Heatmaps helps in visualizing the user behaviour inside the app using different colours.

The warmer colours indicate the highest activity on the screen and the colder colours indicate the lowest activity.

Heatmaps gives data on

  • Where the user interacted the most?
  • Where did the user get frustrated?
  • What elements did they ignore or focus more?

How to use Heatmaps to understand User behaviour?

User behaviour denotes all the actions taken by the user inside the app. What the user clicked, where the user dropped off, where the user found it difficult to navigate and every single interaction of the user.

There are different types of Heatmaps that helps in understanding the user behaviour inside the app.

For example, 

Rage tap Heatmaps are generated when the user taps on an element for more than two times denoting the user’s frustration.

Long press Heatmaps reveals the unresponsive element of the screen that made the user keep pressing on it for a very long time than necessary.

Quit touches in the Heatmaps helps to know the element the user interacted with before quitting the app.

The color code in the Heatmap shows the areas that are most and least interacted by the user and helps the design teams to understand what needs to be taken care of for better user experience.

How to optimize UX of the app using Heatmaps?

 CTAs

For most of the pages on your app, your goal would be the user to click on the CTA.

But a lot of times, the user ignores them either because they are not in the right place to grab the user’s attention or there are too many CTAs on one page.

With Heatmaps, you get to visualize how the user interacts with the CTAs and optimize them accordingly.

Navigation

Without proper navigation, your user is lost and is definitely going to drop-off. You want your user to feel easy to navigate and find what they are looking for. 

Heatmaps help to find where your user has interacted which clearly gives you an idea whether they are able to find the icons, buttons and other elements on your app screen.

Page layout

You have got all the elements tested on your screen. It is also important to know how your user interacts with the page when everything is put together. With Heatmaps combined with session replay tools, you get to see your user’s each and every action inside the app and find out what is not working as expected. You can redesign the elements after studying the drop-off points and optimize the design of the app.

As Steve king clearly stated, usability is about people and how they understand and use things, not just about technology. Always keep in mind your users and their experience with the product. It helps in building better products that users love. Design is not a fixed thing. Users expectations keep changing and the design as well to meet their expectations.

To read more about understanding user frustration, check this out.


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